COVID-19 Updates

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To keep the public informed, the Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders are providing regular updates in government services and pertinent links regarding COVID-19. Coronavirus is a serious illness that spreads from person to person. Cape May County officials are working closely with the State and Federal Government to provide the latest information to help mitigate the spread of this virus.

Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton and Freeholder Jeffrey L. Pierson, who oversees the Cape May County Department of Health want to assure everyone that the County is closely monitoring the spread of COVID-19 in Cape May County and throughout the region. Their foremost goal is to protect the well-being of our employees and families as well as our residents and visitors and continue to provide essential services to our County.

County government will continue to operate, and all government functions will be offered with some adjustments including limited hours of operation and reduced services. Communications remain open and the public is encouraged to call or email for needed services or information.

We are all working together to keep you informed and safe.

Gerald M. Thornton, Freeholder Director
Jeffrey L. Pierson, Freeholder, liaison, Health and Human Services.


Governor Philip D. Murphy 

Executive Orders Regarding COVID-19

Administrative Orders Regarding COVID-19


The Board of Chosen Freeholders have passed resolutions regarding COVID-19, click here to view the resolutions.



covid testing flyer



COVID-19 Update 9/24/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 12 new positive cases among County residents.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1324 including 90 deaths.  

9.24.20 covid graphs

Food or beverage establishments may open, including restaurants, bars, cafeterias, and food courts, as well as all holders of a liquor license with retail consumption privileges.

Establishments must follow appropriate mitigation requirements detailed in the Department of Health's Protocols for Outdoor Dining, Executive Order No. 157, Executive Order No. 183, and the Department of Health's Health and Safety Standards for Indoor Dining, which are summarized below.

What to Expect at Outdoor Restaurants and Bars

Establishments must institute the following policies:

  • Limit seating to a maximum of 8 customers per table - unless from an immediate family or the same household – and arrange seating to achieve a minimum distance of 6 feet between parties;
  • Encourage reservations for greater control of customer traffic;
  • Cordon off any indoor or outdoor dance floors to the public;
  • Require customers to provide a phone number if making a reservation to facilitate contact tracing;
  • Consider alternatives to paper/physical menus (whiteboards, electronic menus);
  • Provide a hand sanitizer station for customers; and
  • Require customers who wish to enter the indoor portion of the establishment to wear a face covering, unless the customer has a medical reason for not doing so or is a child under two years of age;
  • Require that groups stay 6 feet apart, even in areas where groups are not assigned seating;
  • Adhere to all other health and safety protocols in DOH Executive Directive No. 20-019.

Note: Areas with a fixed roof, if two sides are open, comprising over 50% of their total wall space, may operate under rules for outdoor dining under Executive Order No. 163.

What to Expect at Indoor Restaurants and Bars

The following summarizes some of the protocols contained in DOH's Health and Safety Standards for Indoor Dining and EO 183. However, this summary is not a replacement for fully complying with the terms of the health and safety standards and EO 183and businesses should read the full guidance carefully to ensure full compliance.

Food and beverage establishments must:

  • Limit the number of patrons in indoor areas to 25 percent of the food or beverage establishment's indoor capacity, excluding the food or beverage establishment's employees;
  • Limit seating to a maximum of eight (8) customers per table (unless they are from a family from the same household) and arrange seating to achieve a minimum distance of six feet (6 ft) between parties;
  • Require customers to only consume food or beverages while seated;
  • Require patrons to wear face coverings while inside the indoor premises of the food or beverage establishment, except when eating or drinking at their table;
  • For food or beverage establishments with table service, require that customers be seated in order to place orders;
  • For food or beverage establishments with table service, require that wait staff bring food or beverages to seated customers; and
  • Keep doors and windows open where possible and utilize fans to improve ventilation.

Guidance for Employees
 Food or beverage establishments offering service must impose the following requirements on employees:

  • Require employees to wash and/or sanitize their hands when entering the food or beverage establishment;
  • Conduct daily health checks (e.g. temperature screening and/or symptom checking) of employees safely and respectfully, and in accordance with any applicable privacy laws and regulations;
  • Require employees with symptoms of COVID-19 be sent home;
  • Require all employees to wear face coverings, except where doing so would inhibit the individual's health, or if it would create an unsafe condition in which to operate equipment or execute a task (i.e. cooks that work near open flames);
  • Provide all employees with face coverings free of charge;
  • Provide employees break time for repeated handwashing throughout the workday; and
  • Provide sanitization materials, such as hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes to staff.

Full dining guidance for food and beverage establishments can be found in Executive Order No. 157, DOH Executive Directive No. 20-019, Executive Order No. 183, and the Department of Health's Health and Safety Standards for Indoor Dining.

Additionally, a special ruling by the New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) temporarily permits establishments with liquor licenses to expand their licensed premises into outdoor areas. To learn more, refer to the NJ ABC's special ruling.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/23/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 6 new positive cases among County residents as listed below and 1 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1312 including 90 deaths.  

9.23.20 covid graphs

Organized sports activities have restarted in stages.

Low-risk, non-contact sports, such as golf and tennis, can resume practices and competitions, indoors and outdoors.

Medium- and high-risk sports, including baseball, softball, soccer, basketball, and football can resume contact practices and competitions in outdoor settings only. Non-contact practices and drills can resume in both indoor and outdoor settings.

The New Jersey State Department of Health has issued guidance for organized sports with further details on which sports are defined in which category, how to create a sports program preparation plan, how to prepare a facility for sports practices, how to conduct sports practices, and how to prepare for games and tournaments.

All sports will have to abide by a number of health and safety protocols in the guidance, including screenings for athletes, coaches, and staff, limited equipment sharing, strong requirements for disinfecting and sanitizing equipment, and cooperating with local health departments on contact tracing.

Staff, parents, guardians, and visitors are required to wear cloth face coverings at practices and games. Athletes are encouraged to wear masks during downtime, but not during physical activity.
All competitions or tournaments must abide by the limit on outdoor gatherings, which is currently limited to 500 people.


Fall School Sports Season

Sports under the jurisdiction of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) or the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) must also abide by those associations' rules.

The final determination on the fall high school sports seasons will be made by the NJSIAA, and school districts will make the ultimate decision on whether teams will resume competition.

A student-athlete's ability to participate with their team will not be altered in any way - regardless of whether they participate in remote-learning or in-person instruction.

Note: A new law waives the requirement to complete an annual pre-participation physical examination for any student-athlete enrolled in grade six to 12 who either completed a physical examination during the 2019-2020 school year or completed a physical examination that allowed the student to participate on a school-sponsored interscholastic or intramural athletic team or squad during the 2019-2020 school year.

A student-athlete who has not completed a physical examination within 365 days prior to the first day of official practice in the athletic season is permitted to participate on a school-sponsored athletic team provided they complete the physical examination before the end of the athletic season.


Professional Sports

Professional sports teams which train or play in New Jersey can practice and engage in games or matches, if their leagues resume competition.

The State has been in constant discussions with these teams about the protocols they will have in place to protect the health and safety of the players, coaches, and team personnel - including facilities where proper sanitation and hygiene practices can be readily maintained.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/22/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 7 new positive cases among County residents as listed below and 1 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1306 including 90 deaths.

9.22.20 covid graphs

New Jersey Human Services Commissioner announced that applications are now open for the new COVID-19 child care tuition assistance program which was created to help families with child care costs as schools open remotely. The $150 million program will provide child care tuition assistance to New Jersey families with incomes up to $75,000 that are in need of either full or part-time child care due to their child’s remote learning schedule. Families can apply for this assistance by completing the online application at www.ChildCareNJ.gov. Those applying will need proof of income and a notice or announcement from their child’s school of a remote learning schedule. Tuition assistance will be available through December 30, 2020 for eligible residents with school-age children, 5 to 13 years old. Families may submit applications and Human Services will provide the tuition assistance to eligible participants until funding is exhausted. Recipients will be eligible for either full- or parttime support based on their families’ needs. To learn more and apply visit www.ChildCareNJ.gov. 

The tuition assistance is part of $250 million plan announced last month by Governor Murphy to support working families and child care. As part of that plan, the Department is also providing state child care subsidies for families with incomes below 200% of the federal poverty line during the school day for children aged 5 to 13 through December 30, 2020. Families that currently receive state child care subsidies for before and after school care for school age children are being contacted directly to identify their needs during the school day. Child care providers will be paid the subsidy rate for school-age children based on the hours of care needed. Human Services is also supporting child care centers that make it a priority to serve children receiving the child care subsidy by providing supplemental payments of $75 per subsidy-eligible child, per month, including infants, toddlers, and school-age children to providers through the end of the year. Additionally, Human Services is making funding available to licensed child care centers and registered family child care providers in New Jersey that are open or will open by October 1st to manage added operational costs due to new COVID-19 health and safety guidelines. These funds will be available to nearly 6,000 child care providers in New Jersey with increased COVID related costs, such as purchasing PPE and other supplies and materials, cleaning and sanitation, and other operational needs related to COVID-19 that are eligible expenses for the Coronavirus Relief Fund. Funds will be available through an application process that will open in the upcoming weeks through the New Jersey Child Care Information System (NJCCIS). 

Since the start of the pandemic, the Murphy Administration has taken several steps to support child care for families and to support the sustainability of providers including: 1. Increasing investments in child care, including more than $125 million through two key actions: creating and funding State-subsidized emergency child care for essential workers at the peak of the crisis and having provided the State’s child care subsidy to centers based on prior enrollment throughout the spring and summer; 2. Providing grants to child care centers and youth camps to assist in meeting COVID-19 related health and safety guidelines; 3. Waiving parent co-pays in the State’s child care subsidy program for parents who requested it due to impacts from COVID-19; and 4. Delivering personal protective equipment to emergency child care centers and family child care providers. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook. 


COVID-19 Update 9/21/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 10 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1299 including 90 deaths.

9.21.20 covid graphs


COVID-19 and Pregnancy 

According to the Center of Disease Control, pregnant people might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 compared to non-pregnant people. Additionally, pregnant people with COVID-19 may be at increased risk for other adverse outcomes, such as preterm birth. 

Take steps to protect yourself from COVID-19 

There is no way to ensure you have zero risk of infection, so it is important to understand the risks and know how to be as safe as possible. In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. Here are preventive steps you and people you live with can take: 

  • Limit close contact interactions with other people as much as possible. 
  •  When going out or interacting with others outside your immediate household, wear a mask, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. Note that wearing a mask is not a substitute for other everyday prevention actions like washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with other people. 
  • Avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear a mask, if possible. 
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others outside your household. o Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. 
  • Avoid activities where taking protective measures may be difficult and where social distancing can’t be maintained. Continue to seek healthcare Don’t skip your healthcare appointments during and after pregnancy.  Visit your healthcare provider for all recommended appointments. If you need help finding one, contact your nearest hospital clinic, community health, or health department.

Talk to your healthcare provider about o How to stay healthy and take care of yourself and your baby. Any questions you have about the best place to deliver your baby. Delivering your baby is always safest under the care of trained healthcare professionals. If you’re concerned about going to your appointments because of COVID-19, ask your healthcare provider what steps they’re taking to separate healthy patients from those who may be sick. Some healthcare providers may choose to cancel or postpone some visits. Others may switch certain appointments to telemedicine visits, which are appointments over the phone or video. These decisions may be based on the situation in your community as well as your individual health risks. Get recommended vaccines and a 30-day supply of your medicines. Getting the recommended vaccines during pregnancy can help protect you and your baby. Get vaccinated against influenza (or flu). Flu and COVID-19 are both respiratory illnesses that can spread from person to person. They can affect breathing and have similar symptoms, but they are caused by different viruses (read more about similarities and differences between flu and COVID-19). It is unknown how these two viruses may interact during the upcoming flu season. There is no vaccine available to protect against the virus that causes COVID-19. You should protect yourself against flu by getting vaccinated. Others living in your household should also get vaccinated to protect themselves and you. Get the whooping cough (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy to protect your baby against whooping cough, which can also present with similar symptoms to COVID-19. Ask your doctor and pharmacy to give you at least a 30-day supply of the medicines you need. 

Call your healthcare provider if you have any health concerns. These concerns may include: 

  • You think you have COVID-19 (call within 24 hours). 
  • You think you are experiencing depression during or after pregnancy.

You have any questions related to your health. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook


COVID-19 Update 9/20/20

As COVID-19 Continues to be a Part of Everyday Life, It is Important to Not Let Your Guard Down, Even When You are Hosting the Gathering Cape May Court House- The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 2 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1289 including 90 deaths. 

9.20.20 covid graphs

“The closer you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. If you decide to engage in social activities, it is important to protect yourself and practice prevention measures, such as social distancing, hand hygiene and wearing a facial covering,” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer. 

As communities and businesses are opening, people are trying to get back to normal activities as safely as possible. While there is no way to ensure zero risk of infection, it is important to understand potential risks and how to adopt different types of prevention measures to protect yourself and others. When planning your own gathering it is important for you to consider your own personal situation and the risk for you, your family, and your guests. 

Center for Disease Control and Prevention suggests taking the following precautions when hosting a social gathering:  

  • Remind guests to stay home if they are sick. Encourage social distancing. For example, host your gatherings outside, when possible. 
  • Wear facial coverings over nose and mouth when social distancing is not possible, especially when indoors. 
  • Clean hands often with soup and water. If notpossible, use hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol.  
  • Limit the number of people handling or serving food. 
  • Limit contact with commonly touched surfaces or shared items. Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces and any shared items between use when feasible. 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Faceboo


COVID-19 Update 9/19/20

Cape May Court House- The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 8 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. 

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1287 including 90 deaths.  

9.19.20 covid graphs

“Now that we are entering into respiratory season it is going to be more important than ever for individuals to stay home if sick. We urge individuals who think they have COVID-19 or have been diagnosed to stay home and isolate themselves from others,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

When an individual is identified as a positive COVID-19 case they will be asked to isolate. Isolation is when a sick individual is kept from others to help stop the spread of a disease. Unlike quarantine, which is when an individual who is possible exposed is kept from others to help stop the spread of a disease. If you have any of the following symptoms, Fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, and or diarrhea, it is important that you isolate and call your primary care physician to determine what your next step should be. COVID-19 isolation recommendations can vary from person to person. Specific instructions will be given to an individual on a case by case basis.

For most persons with COVID-19 illness, isolation and precautions can generally be discontinued 10 days after symptom onset and resolution of fever for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing medications, and with improvement of other symptoms (CDC,2020). A limited number of persons with severe illness may produce replication-competent virus beyond 10 days that may warrant extending duration of isolation and precautions for up to 20 days after symptom onset; consider consultation with infection control experts. For persons who never develop symptoms, isolation and other precautions can be discontinued 10 days after the date of their first positive RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2 RNA.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/18/20

As Cape May County Continues to See COVID-19 Cases It is Important That Individuals Understand Quarantine

Cape May Court House- The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 13 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. 

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1279 including 90 deaths.  

 9.18.20 covid graphs

Since COVID-19 is a new disease we are still learning new information and best practice on how to decrease the spread. One strategy that is being used to decrease the spread of COVID-19 is by quarantining individuals that are identified as close contacts,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

Quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine differs from isolation because isolation is used to keep a sick individual away from others. An individual is asked to quarantine if they have been identified as a close contact. New Jersey Department of Health defines a close contact as anyone who was within six feet of you for more than 10 minutes at least two days before your positive test if you didn't have any symptoms, or two days before your first symptom appeared. An individual that needs to quarantine should do the following:

Stay home for 14 full days after last exposure

Separate themselves from others

Monitor health Watch for fever (100.4◦F), cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.

Follow directions from their state or local health department

An individual may end quarantine usually after 14 full days after last contact of COVID-19 positive person. If they are in contact with a household contact their quarantine begins when that individual’s isolation period is finished. A negative COVID-19 test does not exempt an individual from quarantine. An individual from state or local health department will be in contact with anyone who is identified as a close contact to give specific instructions on quarantine.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/17/20

As More Indoor Activities Begin to Open In New Jersey it is Important to Continue to Practice Preventative Measures


The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 12 new positive cases among County residents as listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1266 including 90 deaths.

9.17.20 covid graph

“New Jersey continues to open up and now one of the options when you go to one of Cape May County’s restaurants is indoor or outdoor dining. As more indoor activities slowly become available it is important to continue to practice prevention measures against COVID-19, especially with the upcoming respiratory illness season,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

To prepare yourself for eating out Center for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the following:

Check the restaurant’s COVID-19 prevention practices before you go

  • Check the restaurant’s website and social media to see if they have updated their information to address any COVID-19 safety guidelines.
  • Before you go to the restaurant, call, and ask if all staff are wearing masks while at work.
  • Ask about options for self-parking to remove the need for a valet service.
  •  

Take steps to protect yourself at the restaurant

  • Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from other people or indoors.
  • Take precautions – like wearing a mask as much as possible when not eating and maintaining a proper social distance if you are dining with others who don’t live with you.
  • Maintain a social distance of 6 feet or more in any entryway, hallway, or waiting area.
  • When possible, sit outside at tables spaced at least 6 feet apart from other people.
  • When possible, choose food and drink options that are not self-serve to limit the use of shared serving utensils, handles, buttons, or touchscreens.

 

Wash your hands

  • Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when entering and exiting the restaurant. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Before using the restroom, make sure there is adequate soap and paper towels or hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.


Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/16/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 8 new positive cases among County residents as listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1254 including 90 deaths.

9.16.20 covid graphs

“As of September 1,2020, Governor Murphy allowed gyms to reopen at 25% capacity. Exercise is a main component to health, but before you go running back to the gym make sure you continue to take protective precautions, such as cleaning equipment before using, washing hands, wearing a mask, and practice social distancing,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

When returning to your local gym the Center for Disease Control and Prevention suggests doing the following:

 

Prepare before you go


  • Use options for online reservations and check-in systems when available.
  • Look for any extra prevention practices being implemented by the facility, such as new plexiglass barriers, staff wearing masks, and closing of shared locker room space.
  • Be prepared that locker room access may be limited to the restroom area only, prohibiting the use of shower and changing areas.


Limit activity indoors, especially group activities


  • Seek facilities with outdoor space or options for virtual classes and training sessions as much as possible.
  • Limit attendance at indoor group training sessions.  If you do attend such a session, maintain as much distance as possible between yourself and other individuals, and use masks if they do not interfere with your activity. If you need to be indoors, open windows to increase airflow throughout the space.


Use social distancing and limit physical contact


  • Maintain at least 6 feet of separation as much as possible in areas that may lead to close contact (within 6 feet) among other people, such as weight rooms, group fitness studios, pools and saunas, courts and fields, walking/running tracks, locker rooms, check-in areas, parking lots, and routes of entry and exit.
  • Do not shake hands, give high-fives, do elbow bumps, or touch others because close contact increases the risk of acquiring COVID-19.


Take extra precautions with shared equipment


  • Ensure equipment is clean and disinfected. Wipe down machines and equipment with disinfecting wipes and use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol before using machines.
  • Do not share items that cannot be cleaned, sanitized, or disinfected between use, such as resistance bands and weightlifting belts.

 

Wear a mask


  • Wear a mask when interacting with other people to minimize the risk of transmitting the virus.
  • Wearing masks is most important when physical distancing is difficult and when exercise type and intensity allows. Consider doing any vigorous-intensity exercise outside when possible and stay at least 6 feet away from other participants, trainers, and clients if unable to wear a mask.
  • If possible, wear a mask when walking on an indoor track or when doing stretching or low-intensity forms of yoga indoors.
  • Wash your hands before adjusting your mask—review information about proper use, removal, and washing of masks.

 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/15/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 6 new positive cases among County residents as listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1146 including 90 deaths.

9.15.20 covid graphs

“It is possible to get both COVID-19 and the seasonal flu at the same time, which makes it more important to take all precautionary measures. You can prevent the seasonal flu and COVID-19 by covering your coughs and sneezes, social distancing, washing frequently touched surfaces, stay home if sick and washing your hands. The flu vaccine may not protect you from COVID-19, but it is the best way to prevent the flu and in return protect yourself and others,” stated Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

For the upcoming flu season, flu vaccination will be very important because it will help reduce the overall impact of respiratory illnesses on the population and thus lessen the resulting burden on the healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic (CDC, 2020). The vaccine is recommended for everyone six months and older, including pregnant women. Individuals that are at most risk for getting severely ill from the flu are young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes, heart disease or lung disease, and people aged 65 years and older. It takes approximately two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop protection against the flu. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend getting a flu vaccine every year because flu viruses evolve quickly, and last year’s vaccine may not protect against the current year’s strain. Even if the vaccine does not fully protect against the flu, it may reduce the severity of symptoms and the risk of complications.

Most pharmacies and doctors’ offices are offering the flu shot and due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Health Department will be offering free flu vaccine by appointment only at the following locations:

Flu Vaccine Drive -Thru Clinics: Individuals 13 years and older will be offered at the Cape May County Fire Academy, 171 Crest Haven Rd, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210.

  • October 3, 2020 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
  • October 17, 2020 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

 The Family Flu clinics will be offered at Cape May County National Guard Armory, 600 Garden State Pkwy, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 (Exit 11)

  • October 6, 2020, from 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
  • October 14, 2020 from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • October 22, 2020 from 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

All flu clinics are by appointment only and will require a completed consent form. Masks must also be worn to receive a flu vaccine. High dose vaccine will be offered as supplies last. Please request high dose when making your appointment. To make an appointment call (609) 465-1187. For consent forms and more information on upcoming flu clinics, visit www.cmchealth.net - Click Seasonal Flu. Also, like us on Facebook for updated information.


COVID-19 Update 9/14/20

As the New School Year Begins it is Important to Help our Children Cope with Stress During COVID-19

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 4 new positive cases among County residents and 1 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below. Sadly, we are announcing the passing of a 64-year old male from Woodbine, “I would like to express my sincere condolences to friends and family during this sad time,” said Cape May County Freeholder Jeff Pierson.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1240 including 90 deaths.

9.14.20 covid graphs

“With children back in school, parents and/or guardians are helping children adjust to the new norm of school. One of the ways children learn to react to stress is by observing adults in their lives coping mechanisms. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children and better help them cope with stress (CDC, 2020),” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

Families across the country are adapting to the evolving changes in daily life caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Parents and guardians are taking on the responsibility of helping their children adjust to the new normal, such as trying to keep children occupied, feeling safe, and attempting to keep up with schoolwork as best as possible. It is important to remember that children look to adults for guidance on how to react to a stressful situation. Parents can help reduce children’s anxiety by teaching them positive preventative measures, talking with them about their fears, and giving them a sense of some control over their risk of infection. This is also a tremendous opportunity for adults to model for children problem-solving, flexibility, and compassion as we all work through adjusting daily schedules, balancing work and other activities, getting creative about how we spend time, processing new information from authorities, and connecting and supporting friends and family members in new ways (National Association of School Psychologists, 2019). The following tips can help:

  • Be a role model
  • Be aware of how you talk about COVID-19
  • Explain social distancing
  • Demonstrate deep breathing
  • Focus on the positive
  • Establish and maintain a daily routine
  • Identify projects that might help others
  • Offer lots of love and affection

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/13/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 6 new positive cases among County residents and 3 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1236 including 89 deaths.

9.13.20 covid graphs

People with Certain Medical Conditions

People of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 including the following:

COVID-19 is a new disease. Currently there are limited data and information about the impact of underlying medical conditions and whether they increase the risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Based on what we know at this time, people with the following conditions might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

Children who have medical complexity, who have neurologic, genetic, metabolic conditions, or who have congenital heart disease might be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 compared to other children.

The list of underlying conditions is meant to inform clinicians to help them provide the best care possible for patients, and to inform individuals as to what their level of risk may be so they can make individual decisions about illness prevention. We are learning more about COVID-19 every day. This list is a living document that may be updated at any time, subject to potentially rapid change as the science evolves.

Reduce your risk of getting COVID-19

It is especially important for people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19.

The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to:

If you start feeling sick and think you may have COVID-19, get in touch with your healthcare provider within 24 hours.

Venturing out into a public setting? What to consider before you go.

As communities and businesses across the United States are opening, you may be thinking about resuming some activities, running errands, and attending events and gatherings. There is no way to ensure you have zero risk of infection, so it is important to understand the risks and know how to be as safe as possible.

People at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, should consider their level of risk before deciding to go out and ensure they are taking steps to protect themselves. Consider avoiding activities where taking protective measures may be difficult, such as activities where social distancing can’t be maintained. Everyone should take steps to prevent getting and spreading COVID-19 to protect themselves, their communities, and people who are at increased risk of severe illness.

In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. 

  • If you decide to engage in public activities, continue to protect yourself by practicing everyday preventive actions.
  • Keep these items on hand and use them when venturing out: a mask, tissues, and a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, if possible.
  • If possible, avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear masks.

Are you considering in-person visits with family and friends? Here are some things to consider to help make your visit as safe as possible:

When to delay or cancel a visit 

In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. So, think about:

  • How many people will you interact with?
  • Can you keep 6 feet of space between you and others?
  • Will you be outdoors or indoors?
  • What’s the length of time that you will be interacting with people?

Encourage social distancing during your visit

  • Visit with your friends and family outdoors, when possible. If this is not feasible, make sure the room or space is well-ventilated (for example, open windows or doors) and large enough to accommodate social distancing.
  • Arrange tables and chairs to allow for social distancing. People from the same household can be in groups together and don’t need to be 6 feet apart from each other.
  • Consider activities where social distancing can be maintained, like sidewalk chalk art or yard games.
  • Try to avoid close contact with your visitors. For example, don’t shake hands, elbow bump, or hug. Instead wave and verbally greet them.
  • If possible, avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear masks.
  • Consider keeping a list of people you visited or who visited you and when the visit occurred. This will help with contact tracing if someone becomes sick.

Wear masks

  • Masks should be worn over the nose and mouth. Masks are especially important when it is difficult to stay at least 6 feet apart from others or when people are indoors to help protect each other.
  • Masks may slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others
    • Wearing a mask helps protects others in case you’re infected, while others wear one to protect you should they be infected.
  • Who should NOT use masks: Children under age 2 or anyone who has trouble breathing, is unconscious, or is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

Wash hands often

  • Everyone should wash their hands for at least 20 seconds at the beginning and end of the visit and whenever you think your hands may have become contaminated.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, such as with outdoor visits or activities, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Remind guests to wash or sanitize their hands before serving or eating food.
  • Use single-use hand towels or paper towels for drying hands so visitors do not share towels. Have a no-touch trash can available for guests to use.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/12/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 7 new positive cases among County residents.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1230 including 89 deaths.

9.12.20 covid graphs

Deciding to Go Out

  • In general, the more closely you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread.
  • If you decide to engage in public activities, continue to protect yourself by practicing everyday preventive actions.
  • Keep these items on hand when venturing out: a mask, tissues, and a hand sanitizer with

Understand the potential risks of going out

As communities and businesses are opening, you may be looking for ways to resume some daily activities as safely as possible. While there is no way to ensure zero risk of infection, it is important to understand potential risks and how to adopt different types of prevention measures to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The risk of an activity depends on many factors, such as:

  • Is COVID-19 spreading in your community?
  • Will you have a potential close contact with someone who is sick or anyone who is not wearing a mask (and may be asymptomatic)?
  • Are you at increased risk of severe illness?
  • Do you take everyday actions to protect yourself from COVID-19?

CDC cannot provide the specific risk level for every activity in every community. That’s why it’s important for you to consider your own personal situation and the risk for you, your family, and your community before venturing out.

Close contact with other people increases risk

In general, the more closely you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. So, think about:

How many people will you interact with?

  • Interacting with more people raises your risk.
  • Being in a group with people who aren’t social distancing or wearing masks increases your risk.
  • Engaging with new people (e.g., those who don’t live with you) also raises your risk.
  • Some people have the virus and don’t have any symptoms, and it is not yet known how often people without symptoms can transmit the virus to others.

Can you keep 6 feet of space between you and others? Will you be outdoors or indoors?

  • The closer you are to other people who may be infected, the greater your risk of getting sick.
  • Keeping distance from other people is especially important for people who are at higher risk for severe illness, such as older adults and those with underlying medical conditions.
  • Indoor spaces are more risky than outdoor spaces where it might be harder to keep people apart and there’s less ventilation.

What’s the length of time that you will be interacting with people?

  • Spending moretime with people who may be infected increases your risk of becoming infected.
  • Spending more time with people increases their risk of becoming infected if there is any chance that you may already be infected.

What makes activities safer

Activities are safer if

  • You can maintain at least 6 feet of space between you and others. COVID-19 spreads easier between people who are within 6 feet of each other.
  • They are held in outdoor spaces. Indoor spaces with less ventilation where it might be harder to keep people apart are more risky.
  • People are wearing masks. Interacting without wearing masks also increases your risk.


Prioritize outdoor spaces where people are wearing masks and keeping 6 feet away from others

Stay home if you are sick

If you have COVID-19, have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, or have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, it is important to stay home and away from other people. When you can leave home and be around others depends on different factors for different situations.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 9/11/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 11 new positive cases among County residents.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1223 including 89 deaths.